15.1


Oh, Sherrie

Sherrie Levine’s work has, for decades, influenced our concept of art, design, self, and issues still central to the lives of women. Contributor Nicole Dyar takes on Levine’s work directly, and how the question of identity is even more precarious for women in the digital age. Dyar asks if an authentic woman can even exist in contemporary America, where identity is pushed upon us from an ever-present media. Sarah McCoy is more indirect in her essay, addressing feminism as it pertains to graphic design history. Women are frequently left out of the narrative, and McCoy seeks to rectify this, bringing light to early colonial women printers. Hayden Roma takes a standard female icon, Barbie, and revisits Barbie through a personal and trans-cultural lens. Barbie changes as we change, her identity isn’t fixed but revisionist. Lisa Jarrett’s poetic view on experience touches upon longing and memory, asking if it is fair to commodify a loved one through art, through the publication.

Contributors to Issue 15.1 (“Oh, Sherrie”):
Nicole Dyar | Sarah McCoy | Hayden Roma | Lisa Jarrett

Theme: Feminism and identity
Aesthetic: Smog and obfuscation
Printing Method: Offset with letterpress inserts created by Sarah McCoy
Student Assistants: Tricia Leach

Nicole Dyar is a Graphic Designer based in Houston, Texas. Her personal work is reflective and typographic, fully anchored in the pursuit of the self. | Sarah McCoy has her MFA from the University of Iowa and is currently an Associate Professor at Drake University. Sarah also co-owns The Permanent Collection Press, a letterpress and design studio in Des Moines. | Hayden Roma, affiliated with Portland State, is a recent graphic design graduate, with interests in illustration and criticism. Lisa Jarrett was the James DePriest Visiting Professor of Art at Portland State University until she was hired in as an Assistant Professor in 2017.