16.1


Dis Obey

Volume 16.1, “Dis Obey,” includes articles dissecting appropriation from a variety of vantage points. Contributor Julianna Johnson opens the publication with an essay outlining her experience as a designer and illustrator who has had her work stolen and re-sold through Amazon. Bonnie Blake writes on typography and “oriental exoticism,” and the appropriation of Chinese characters in food, restaurants and film. Nic Meier plays with appropriation as a generative practice for creating work, borrowing from Sol Lewitt and Eva Hesse. Aaron Secrist writes a pro-appropriation essay on what it means to be a design student just about to graduate, and how appropriation can best serve us. Andrew DeRosa, inspired by Learning from Las Vegas takes us along a drive from New York to New England, noticing buildings and signs that are direct appropriations of the environment immediately surrounding them.

Contributors to Issue 16.1 (“Letting Go”):
Julianna Johnson | Bonnie Blake | Nic Meier | Aaron Secrist | Andrew DeRosa

Theme: Appropriation
Aesthetic: Appropriated graphics and illustrations
Printing Method: Digital 
Student Assistants: Eileen Ewing & Kyle Charlson

Julianna Johnson is a Portland-based designer whose studio practice focuses on brand development, print design, and illustration. She is driven by a commitment to personal work that reflects her love of nature, visual narrative, and real materials. | Bonnie Blake is a practicing designer, design researcher, and author/co-author of six publications on digital media. A Professor of Design and Interactive Media at Ramapo College, Bonnie’s scholarly work focuses on expressions of cultural otherness in visual language and the creative space of the future. Bonnie holds an MFA from Columbia University. | Nicolas Meier is a graphic designer, researcher, printer, and super-serious person. His work explores theories, histories, and processes behind art, architecture, design, and social movements from the 20th century to the present. | Aaron Secrist is a freshly graduated graphic designer with a knack for illustration, print media, and web design. Outside of art and design he’s interested in sci-fi, tabletop RPGs, and internet culture. | Andrew DeRosa is an Assistant Professor of Design at Queens College, City University of New York. His work balances studio practice and design research related to social design, design ethics, pedagogy, and creative practice.